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Content Manager @ Neil Patel Digital India, Neil Patel Digital (India)
Apr 08, 2022
- Discipline 
- Patience 
and
 - Learning 

3 Most important parameters that make you a valuable asset everywhere & in every sphere of life! 

Do you all agree??

#Fridaythoughts #quoteoftheday #life #inspiration #motivationalquotes #writing #mindset #mannkizubani
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Head of Design, Northstar
Feb 11, 2022
Released my first newsletter post under Folder!

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Art Director, Summer Friday
Jan 04, 2022

The Misgivings of Imposter Syndrome


Today, like many other days, I don’t feel useful or valuable to my clients, my employer, or even my wife. I feel like all that anyone knows about me is false and that I am an imposter.
In a previous post on Im[poster Syndrome I talk about how,

“Imposter feelings represent a conflict between your own self-perception and the way others perceive you. Even as others praise your talents, you write off your successes to timing and a bit of luck. You don’t believe you earned them on your own merits and you fear others will eventually realize the same thing. Over time, this can fuel a cycle of anxiety, depression, and guilt.”

And even though I know that these feelings of being an “Imposter” are really just my own insecurities and personal identity issues coming to the surface, at this moment they are very real.
The scary part for me is my ADHD urge to burn it all down, to quit my job, go shopping and inevitably get in an explosive fight with my wife. That would be the manic side of ADHD. And it is often the side that get’s me in trouble. My HFASD (High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder) side then wants to find a hole, crawl in and never come out.
My intellectual self knows that I am valuable, intelligent, talented, needed, wanted and that I matter to those in my life and the spheres of influence I occupy. But the problem is knowing something is vastly different than believing them. I know those things to be true, because past evidence proves they are true, but my biggest struggle is I don’t believe they are true.
I write in my other post that,

Success doesn’t require perfection. True perfection is impossible, so failing to achieve it doesn’t make you a fraud, it makes you normal. Offering yourself kindness and compassion instead of judgment and self-doubt can help you maintain a realistic perspective and motivate you to pursue healthy self-growth.

and I’m honestly doing my best to believe that, but today, today it is hard to believe. Never in my life have I felt normal. Never in my life have I felt that I deserve compassion or grace or even kindness. So when I receive that from other people I weep with joy. But offering it to myself. That’s hard.
So to all those out there who struggle with self-worth and the feelings of being an imposter, you are not alone.

Cheers,
Justin Von Braun
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Art Director, Summer Friday
Oct 15, 2021

How to deal with Imposter Syndrome


Imposter syndrome, also called perceived fraudulence, involves feelings of self-doubt and personal incompetence that persist despite your education, experience, and accomplishments.
I dealt with imposter syndrome for years. Even as an accomplished designer I still experienced times when I feel like a fraud. Here are some tips on how I have overcome this.
To counter these feelings, you might end up working harder and holding yourself to ever higher standards. This pressure can eventually take a toll on your emotional well-being and your performance.
Imposter feelings represent a conflict between your own self-perception and the way others perceive you. Even as others praise your talents, you write off your successes to timing and a bit of luck. You don’t believe you earned them on your own merits and you fear others will eventually realize the same thing. Over time, this can fuel a cycle of anxiety, depression, and guilt.

The Five Types


Leading imposter syndrome researcher Dr. Valerie Young describes in her 2011 book The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women. These competence types, as she calls them, reflect your internal beliefs around what competency means to you.

The Perfectionist


You focus primarily on how you do things, often to the point where you demand perfection of yourself in every aspect of life. Yet, since perfection isn’t always a realistic goal, you can’t meet these standards. Instead of acknowledging the hard work you’ve put in after completing a task, you might criticize yourself for small mistakes and feel ashamed of your “failure.”

The Natural Genius


You’ve spent your whole life picking up new skills with little effort and believe you should understand new material and processes right away. Your belief that competent people can handle anything with little difficulty leads you to feel like a fraud when you have a hard time. If something doesn’t come easily to you, or you fail to succeed on your first try, you might feel ashamed and embarrassed and give up.

The Rugged Individualist


You believe you should be able;e to handle everything solo. If you can’t achieve success independently, you consider yourself unworthy. Asking someone for help, or accepting support when it’s offered, doesn’t just mean failing your own high standards. It also means admitting your inadequacies and showing yourself as a failure.

The Expert


Before you can consider your work a success, you want to learn everything there is to know on that topic. You might spend so much time pursuing your quest for more information that you end up having to devote more time to your main task. Since you believe you should have all the answers, you might consider yourself a fraud or failure when you can’t answer a question or encounter some knowledge you previously missed.
And finally,

The Superhero


You link competence to your ability to succeed in every role you hold: student, friend, employee, or parent. Failing to successfully navigate the demands of these roles simply proves, in your opinion, your inadequacies. Still, even this maximum effort may not resolve your imposter feelings. You might think, “I should be able to do more,” or “This should be easier.”

How to overcome these “identities” and obstacles.


Firstly, Acknowledge your Feelings.
Identifying imposter feelings and bringing them out in the light of day can accomplish several goals. Talking to a trusted friend, mentor, or colleague about your distress can help you get perspective and context on the situation. Sharing imposter feelings can help them feel less overwhelming. Also, opening up to peers about how you feel creates a safe space and encourages them to do the same, helping you to realize that you aren’t alone or the only one who feels like an imposter.
Build Connections.
Avoid giving in to the urge to do everything yourself. Instead, turn to classmates, academic peers, and coworkers to create a network of mutual support.

Remember, you can’t achieve everything alone

Sharing imposter feelings can also help others in the same position feel less alone and isolated. It also creates the opportunity to share strategies for overcoming these feelings and related challenges you might encounter.
Change your Doubts.
When imposter feelings surface, ask yourself whether any actual facts support these beliefs. Then, look for pieces of evidence to counter them. If you consistently receive encouragement or recognition for your work, that’s a good sign you’re doing plenty right — and deserve a chance for promotion.
A big one here is, Avoid Comparing Yourself to Others.
Everyone has unique abilities. You are where you are because someone recognized your talents and your potential. You may not excel in every task you attempt, but you don’t have to, either. Almost no one can “do it all.” Even when it seems like someone has everything under control, you may not know the full story. Instead of allowing others’ success to highlight your flaws, consider exploring ways to develop the abilities that interest you.

The Bottom Line


Success doesn’t require perfection. True perfection is impossible, so failing to achieve it doesn’t make you a fraud, it makes you normal. Offering yourself kindness and compassion instead of judgment and self-doubt can help you maintain a realistic perspective and motivate you to pursue healthy self-growth.
Remember, You are valuable, You can do it, You will fail, You will make mistakes and you will learn from it. But you are talented and you will succeed.


Cheers,
Justin Von Braun
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Art Director, Summer Friday
Nov 15, 2021

Failure is part of Progression


There have been so many times in my personal and professional careers that I have been so fearful of failure that I have made myself sick. In our society, we are taught to be fearful of failure from a very young age. We are conditioned to think that if we fail our school homework or projects or sports that OUR LIFE WILL COME TO AN END. And we continue to be conditioned in this mindset long into our adulthood and then into seniority. It comes down to “if you don’t do this thing or if you fail at this certain thing then YOU WILL BE HOMELESS AND DIE and so we drive ourselves insane working for this fear of failure machine. I, like you, was trapped in this cycle for the longest time until I got so sick both physically and mentally that I had to change something.
I began to change my thinking in failure and fear when I left my job as an executive chef at 5 restaurants. I was so exhausted from the pressure and long hours of being made to feel like if I didn’t do this thing or that I was going to fail at my job, my life become nothing, and lose everything I had built my life and career around.
It wasn’t until I started my own business as a food photographer that I learned through much trial and error that failure, in itself, IS NOT THE END.
In a lot of cases, failure is only the beginning. I began to understand that failure is a vital part of progression and eventually success. I was so sick of things happening to me that I made a conscious choice to make things happen for me.
Fear is a funny thing. If you let it, it will keep you, prisoner, forever, and when we fear something we become irrational and volatile. Fear is not something that needs to control you, instead, learn to master your fear and you will truly find peace. But this is not always as easy as it sounds. It takes a lifetime to truly master these skills.
The real “come to Jesus” moments happen when you understand that of course, you will fail, make mistakes and give in to fear but that’s all just part of the process. There is a difference between being a slave to your fear and occasionally being afraid of things. Failure is just as useful a tool as success is because it teaches you something about yourself and how to can overcome obstacles both personal and professional. We can always learn something or take something away from our failures just as much as from our successes.
As a Commercial Photographer, it was partly my job to help people face their fears and insecurities of body image. I have often worked with people to help them understand that true beauty comes from the inside and no matter what failures they’ve experienced or mistakes they’ve made. No matter what negative thing anyone has ever said to them ultimately that doesn’t matter unless they allow it to matter. People who are afraid or miserable will try to make you miserable and afraid so that they don’t feel so crappy and if you do anything good or if anything good happens to you they will try to drag you down to their level. But you cannot let others control the outcome of your life. Ultimately you are the master of your destiny. Any progression, successes, or failures happen, happen because of the choices you make.
I clung to the motto of “Do not tell me what I can or cannot do” for most of my life. Meaning do not try to control the outcome of my life because I will be the master of my destiny. And where that helped me through a lot of tough situations, that attitude was still an attitude of fear. I was afraid that if you tried to tell me who I was or wasn’t, I might believe you.
Now, my motto for life is DO MORE. Instead of being rebellious and telling people to not tell me what I can or cannot do, I listen to their opinion and try to find nuggets of truth in what they are saying and determine if they are speaking to me out of their own failures and fear or out of tried and tested life lessons. Then I take those nuggets and use them to DO MORE.
There is always something you can do more to improve your life and the lives of those you are connected to. Instead of rejecting people's criticisms, we can take those opinions and use parts and pieces of them to create change, both in ourselves and our shares of influence.
Remember, You are valuable, You can do it, You will fail, You will make mistakes and you will learn from it. But you are talented and you will succeed.
But ultimately, regardless of anything you do or do not do, you matter.
Do not let failure be the end.

Cheers,
Justin Von Braun
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Senior architect, fourTheorem
Feb 07, 2022
Published a new issue of FullStack Bulletin newsletter

Fullstack Bulletin Issue #259


https://us15.campaign-archive.com/?u=b015626aa6028495fe77c75ea&id=251612320c

In this issue:

  • How We Fail to Take Accessibility Seriously
  • Node.js Streams
  • Add less (for performance)
  • Using React Query
  • A pixel's color
  • Intro to WebAssembly
  • Crafting Component Libraries
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