Philipp Temmel

  • @philipp
  • Product Designer, iTranslate GmbH
  • Austria
Product Designer, Writer, and Curator....  
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2021

Aug 31, 2021
Aug 31, 2021
Got featured in a newsletter
Got featured by Revue
Got Featured in an Article
+ 1
Back in July, I published a blog post about everything I have learned while growing my weekly newsletter Creativerly to over 1000 subscribers.

Today, this blog post got featured by Revue's very own newsletter called "This week in newsletters", a weekly update for newsletter editors and audience managers, sent every Tuesday morning in the US, afternoon in Europe, and evening in Asia.

Revue also shared the post on their Twitter Profile to almost 30k followers. What an amazing achievement. ✨🥳

Thank you, Revue!

You can find Revue's post including my blog post, right here.
Jul 18, 2021
Jul 18, 2021
Got Featured in an Article
Got featured in publisherweekly.org
Got featured by Ghost.org
Got featured in a newsletter
+ 2
Publisherweekly.org is a weekly newsletter by Ghost.org in which they share the most important stories, ideas & resources about independent publishing.

In issue 159 of publisherweekly.org my blog post about Creativerly reaching 1000 subscribers in which I shared all my learnings and tactics while building and growing a weekly newsletter to over 1000 subscribers.

You can find issue 159 of publisherweekly.org right here and I am more than excited that you will find my blog post inside. 🤩
Jul 10, 2021
Jul 10, 2021
Wrote a Blog Post
Published a blog post
Reached 1000 newsletter subscribers
Reached a milestone
+ 2
Creativerly just crossed over 1000 subscribers, a magical milestone. 

In my newest blog post, I covered all the insights, findings, and experiences I got while growing the newsletter to over 1000 subscribers. 

Here is a quick overview of the points I cover within the blog post:


  • Do not write for numbers - With the recent newsletter boom, people are blinded by the folks who are earning a fortune by writing a newsletter. If you want to start writing online, no matter if in the form of a newsletter or blog, do not start writing because of gaining a lot of subscribers or earning a lot of money, in the first place. Write for yourself, as writing is an incredibly creative process. Writing online and putting yourself out there is one of the best investments you can make, no matter from which background you come.

  • Consistency is (still) key - Consistency is one of the most important factors when it comes down to building a writing habit. If you want to put yourself out there, do it on a constant basis. Start creating a piece of content every single week, and stick to it. Writing and creating consistently is hard, but once you stick to it over a certain period of time, you will build up a habit and it will become easier the longer you stick to it.

  • Be curious - learn from others who already achieved your goals - Always be curious - always ask questions. Do you want to know how to reach your first 100 subscribers? Ask folks who already have 100 subscribers and learn from them how they reached this goal. If you want to know how to reach 500 subscribers, same procedure, find folks who already achieved that and ask them what they did to reach that goal.

  • Share your wins -  A lot of people underestimate how incredibly valuable your wins can be for others. Most people who succeed at writing online and creating content did not reinvent the wheel, they simply shared what they have learned. By sharing their experiences and wins they helped others searching for exactly the same problems as others already have solved.

  • Be active in communities - If you already know what you want to write about, try to be active in communities related to the field and topics you are writing about. This will not only spark new ideas, but you will also find folks who are already interested in the content you create. Therefore, being active in communities can lead to new subscribers or new readers and ultimately new connections.

You can read the in-depth blog post on creativerly.com.
Jun 22, 2021
Jun 22, 2021
Wrote a Blog Post
Published a blog post
As a privacy advocate, I am trying to avoid any Google products and services. I already ditched Google Analytics a couple of years back because I had the impression it was bloated, overloaded, hard to use, and probably completely overkill for anyone who just wants to get basic insights about the traffic happening on a blog or a personal site.

Therefore, I decided to search for a minimal and lightweight solution, that does not invade my user's rights and simply delivers an overview of the traffic happening on my site.

After I shared my finding within a Twitter Thread, I decided to turn it into an in-depth blog post highlighting all the privacy-friendly and ethical Google Analytics alternatives. Besides the blog post, I also created an Airtable database which makes it super easy to conveniently scroll through all the Google Analytics alternatives I have gathered so far.

Check out the blog post here: You do not need Google Analytics

Jan 10, 2021
Jan 10, 2021
Published a blog post
Wrote a Blog Post
As my newsletter Creativerly grew and evolved from a hobby into a passion project, I decided to move from Substack to Ghost and turn it into a full-fledged publication consisting of a newsletter, a blog, and an interview series.

I gathered my learnings, findings, and experience with moving my newsletter from Substack to Ghost and host it myself using DigitalOcean in a blog post, so others who might want to switch from Substack to Ghost too have a guide and get an overview on the pros and cons of both platforms.

You can read the blog post right here.

2019

Jun 24, 2019
Jun 24, 2019
Graduated from University of Applied Sciences FH Joanneum
Graduated university
Studying information design at the University of Applied Sciences Joanneum taught me the basics of typography, UI design, 3D animation, and photography and film. In addition, I have always made it my job to continue to educate myself while studying and to acquire new skills. And I am still pursuing this task.

Although I come from classical graphic design background through my studies and also through my activities before my studies, in the past three years I have specialized in digital design and above all in user interface design.

Despite my clear focus and my specialty, I still refer to myself as a multidisciplinary designer, because in my opinion, a multidisciplinary mindset is very important, especially in the area of design. As designers, we cannot always stay within our bubble. We also have to leave our specialty areas to broaden our horizons. One of the most important things I've learned as a designer is to always be curious, ask questions, and just soak up any information around you like a sponge.
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